Punjab Rural Support Programme
| Home | DSUs | Business Opportunities | Jobs | Contact us |
History

It may have started from Lodharan back in August 1999 with three Basic Health Units. The man behind that experience was Mr. Jahangir Khan Tareen, at that time one man Task Fource of the Punjab Government for the Agriculture sector. These BHUs, after takeover by the National Rural Support Programme (NRSP), were run by one Medical Officer (MO) engaged at an enhanced salary. A “Revolving Fund” of Rs. 100,000 for maintaining a stock of high quality medicines was privately created for the 3 BHUs. Patients at the BHUs could purchase these medicines while medicines supplied by Government were provided free. The Fund revolved as many as twenty two times during 36 months. The three BHUs were considered “better maintained” and the monthly turn-out of patients at the three facilities registered an increase from 515 to a maximum of 2630. Given the circumstances of the Lodhran initiative, not many other avenues for change were considered possible.

Later in 2003, Mr. Jahangir Khan Tareen was MNA from Rahim Yar Khan and an Advisor to the Chief Minister Punjab on “New Initiatives in the Social Sector”. He is now the Federal Minister for Industries, Production and Special Initiatives. It was Mr. Tareen who prevailed upon the PRSP to be the engine for the Rahim Yar Khan Pilot. It is difficult to say in what way the Lodhran experience became the precursor of the Rahim Yar Khan (RYK) Pilot except that both are conceived around BHUs and both cluster a number of BHUs in the care of one Medical Officer. The similarity may not, however, go beyond these two features. But the Lodhran experience may have encouraged thoughts along more ambitious lines. From PRSP’s side, it must be conceded here that it did not know everything important about the Initiative that it had agreed to launch. However, one thing that PRSP understood perfectly from the start was the importance of Healthcare to poverty. An Initiative to provide primary healthcare service to the rural communities, therefore, had a powerful appeal for the PRSP. The strategy for achieving the objective was admittedly vague in the beginning. The relevance of PRSP to the Initiative in the form of a precise role was likewise ambiguous. It was important, therefore, to formulate a strategy and evolve a role which drew upon the special strengths of the PRSP.

 
  Download Brochure    

|

|

|

|

|

|

|

|

   
 

|

|

|

|

|

|

|

|

   

 

Download Adobe Reader
Explore CMIPHC Districts in Punjab Map
New Initiatives by CMIPHC
Source of Funding
Contact us

TOLL FREE 0800-11122

 

Press Clips

 
For your Feedback

------------------------------------------------------------------
Copyrights © 2013 Project Support Unit, Punjab